Tag Archives: Bill Ostrem

New blog: Northfield Nonmotorized

sean-glassesnomo-sshotThe City of Northfield’s Nonmotorized Transportation Task Force sunsets this month. Some of the members started a new blog about a month ago titled Northfield Nonmotorized, with the tagline: “Northfield and Dundas Trails and Bikeways | Safe Routes to School | Mill Towns Trail.”

Sean Hayford O’Leary is the primary blogger thus far, with Neil Lutsky and Bill Ostrem chiming in with comments.

The white stripes, now calming traffic on Lincoln

white striping on Lincoln St./Lincoln ParkwayBill Ostrem, pedestrian/bike advocate, blogger, and chair of the Northfield Area Task Force on Nonmotorized Transportation, alerted me to the new white stripes (no, not The White Stripes) on Lincoln St./Lincoln Parkway. He learned from City Administrator Joel Walinski at the 3rd Ward meeting on Saturday that the striping is for traffic calming. Bill wrote, “As long as there are few cars parked on the street, I see them as being quasi bike lanes. Now we’ll see if they actually slow traffic.” As a chronic speeder, I’m all for more white stripes.

Guest blogger Bill Ostrem: Rice County leaves its sidewalk and path policy unchanged

County Road 43
County Road 43

Last August the Rice County Board of Commissioners made a change in their transportation policy that goes against the interests of people who walk, bike, or use wheelchairs in our community. It’s a change that’s detrimental to many of the most vulnerable users of our transportation system, including children, seniors, the poor, and the handicapped. (continued) Continue reading Guest blogger Bill Ostrem: Rice County leaves its sidewalk and path policy unchanged

Guest blogger Bill Ostrem: The American streets renaissance

bend_roundaboutIn a February 6 post Tracy Davis referred to a short essay by the Project for Public Spaces titled “A Revolution in Transportation Planning.” It’s an excellent piece that discusses the history of transportation planning in the United States – how planners and leaders focused almost solely  on the automobile for most of the twentieth century, often to the detriment of our cities and neighborhoods and our own health, and how they have recently begun to consider all modes of transportation, including transit, walking, and biking. (continued)
Continue reading Guest blogger Bill Ostrem: The American streets renaissance