Tag Archives: Carleton College

Photos: Fall colors at Carleton

Monarch butterfly near Lyman Lakes, Carleton College honeybee, Lyman Lakes, Carleton College honeybee, Lyman Lakes, Carleton College honeybee, Goodsell Observatory, Carleton College
Not much in the way of fall colors in the above photos I took this morning adjacent to Carleton College’s Lyman Lakes but the monarch butterfly and the bees took priority.  If you’ve ever looked to nature for inspiration of home decor – right now is the season to figure out how to use taupe in your home with the gentle, warm fall colors everywhere outside to inspire you.

A little more color in the photos below. I’ll try again later this week.

Fall colors near Lyman Lakes, Carleton College Fall colors near Lyman Lakes, Carleton College Fall colors near Lyman Lakes, Carleton College Fall colors near Lyman Lakes, Carleton College

Frames of Engagement photo exhibition at Carleton’s Weitz Center for Creativity

Academic Civic Engagement photo contest Frames of Engagement photo exhibition Frames of Engagement photo exhibition Frames of Engagement photo exhibition
This summer, Adrienne Falcon, Director of Academic Civic Engagement (ACE) at Carleton College, invited members of the community to submit photos "on the themes of celebrating community and learning beyond the classroom for the first Carleton exhibit on Community Engagement in Rice County."

The selected photos are now part of an exhibition called Frames of Engagement that runs through Sept. 25 in the White Spaces at the Weitz Center for Creativity which opens to the Northfield community today with an open house, 3-6 pm.

This exhibition highlights civic engagement between Carleton, the Northfield community, and beyond. Situated in Northfield’s former middle school, this exhibition demonstrates Carleton’s desire to preserve and commemorate elements of the community’s past while also offering it a vast arena for future collaboration and connection.

I submitted six photos and when I visited the exhibition last night, was delighted to find out that they were all on display.  I’ve added the originals to this album of photos of the walls of the exhibit.

See the large slideshow (recommended) or SLOW CLICK this small slideshow:

Photo album of film shoot: Girl Meets Bike

Ruth Menard, Girl Meets Bike Northfield film shoot: Girl Meets Bike Northfield film shoot: Girl Meets Bike

Northfield film shoot: Girl Meets Bike  Ruth Menard, Girl Meets Bike Production Coordinator Aiyana Ruggiero with Joshua from the HideAway Jessica Paxton and the boys in the Northfield film shoot: Girl Meets Bike 
The independent film Girl Meets Bike is being shot in and around Northfield this week by the Minneapolis-based production company, Moto Girl Films, Inc.  Why here? The Carleton College connection.

Actors include Ruth Menard as Kat; Melissa Pizaarro as Ty; Dave Engler as Becker; Palf Schirg at Martin; Sam Scherf as James.

Producer/Director: Eric Tretbar; Line Producer: Jessica Paxton; Production Coordinator: Aiyana Ruggiero.

Locals are involved as extras and more. More photos to come.

Update 07/11, 7:30 am: See the album of 28 photos (including the 7 above), the large slideshow (recommended), or SLOW CLICK this small slideshow:

Colleges & contentment: Blue skies, hot dogs, & a baseball double header

Knights Field Knights Field Knights Field Knights Field Knights Field
After seeing a Tweet from Ross on Saturday, Robbie and I wandered through the Upper Arb to catch part of the baseball double header between Carleton and St. Thomas at Knights Field, the Carls’ new baseball facility northeast of the Recreation Center. Saaaaweeeeet.

Carleton sports:  Knights Miss Chance for Sweep, Settle for Split Against St. Thomas

St. Thomas sports: Rally lets Baseball split pair at Carleton

Oles & Carls toss cans, bottles & Zamboni tires on ice during club hockey brawl; ref injured, police called. This is a friendly rivalry?

St. Olaf Carleton hockey brawl - photo by JULIA AAKERMANITOU MESSENGERSt. Olaf Carleton hockey brawlA college club hockey game at Northfield’s ice arena was the scene of an ugly incident a month ago involving Carleton and St. Olaf students, both players and spectators. I just found out about it this week when a LoGro reader alerted me.

Having behaved badly at times during my college days at St. Thomas, I’m not quick to make a big deal over college kids doing stupid or offensive stuff. But this was over the top.

As far as I know, there have been no public statements about this incident from the administrations of either St. Olaf or Carleton.

Here’s what’s been reported:

Manitou Messenger news: Club hockey team brawls with rival Carls; Team injures referee, prompting police intervention

Spectators howled and jeered as game play took a violent turn in the St. Olaf versus Carleton club hockey game on Friday, March 4 at the Northfield Ice Arena.  The stands were packed with students, predominantly Oles, many of whom began the evening shouting profanities and other negative cheers, including the standard “Carleton sucks!”

The St. Olaf players were just as rambunctious as the fans. “St. Olaf had about as many penalty minutes as they had game minutes,” spectator Thomas Hegland ’13 said. When the crowd threw soda cans and bottles onto the ice, St. Olaf was penalized, and additional bottles and cans along with zamboni tires were thrown onto the ice in retaliation.

Manitou Messenger editorial: Club hockey brawl triggers shame and stitches

After several minutes the fight finally ended, leaving gear strewn across the ice. There were drops of blood from a referee, who had been “seriously injured,” as the St. Olaf student announcer stated over the loud speaker. The referee attempted to pull players apart. As he skated to the bench the fight left a deep sense of shame and disappointment in me.

Not only did I feel shame because of the fight, but also because of the cheers of “F— you, Carleton,” “F— you, Olaf,” “ugly b—-es,” etc., and because of the constant throwing of trash onto the ice. I was even more surprised that one of the St. Olaf students on the bench threw tires onto the ice and then walked out of the arena.

College Confidential story: Hockey Brawl with St. Olaf

There were several other incidents that weren’t in the articles. I have no idea what happened in the St. Olaf locker rooms, but I do know that one of the Carleton players asked the police to watch the Carleton locker room, because St. Olaf fans were lined up outside the locker room when they went back in between periods. My friend’s stick and gloves were stolen when he was in the bathroom. I don’t know what happened in the Ole locker rooms, but I’m sure it wasn’t exactly peaceful either.

Lastly – the fight was ugly and intense. In addition to the players, several spectators actually jumped over the glass onto the ice so that they could join the fight – it was ridiculous. I have no idea who hit the ref, but both schools were equally at fault and it was really startling. I wasn’t aware that the game was called a draw, but it doesn’t surprise me.

In short, it was an ugly game. There were a lot of drunk fans from both schools, and the tensions elevated really quickly. I don’t expect another Carleton-St. Olaf game for a while.

Badjocks.com story: College Hockey Game Turns Into Brawl, Ends With Referee Slashed in Face w. Skate

Naturally, the game was called a draw and the police spent hours afterwords clearing up the brawls OUTSIDE the arena.

The Northfield police report for March 4 only says:

Event Number: LNO110304002932
Date/Time Incident: 03/4/2011 9: 7: 9 PM
Type:  L/EXTRA PATROL
Address:  12XX BOLLENBACHER DR
Disposition: ADVISED OR ASSISTED

This 2008 Carletonian article tells the story of local police ticketing students for alcohol consumption at club hockey games:  Strong Northfield police presence at recent Chiefs game

The question may remain unsolvable. For the more immediate future, one of the written-up students suggested that the school warn students if there is knowledge of likely increased police activity. “I think the school really made a faux pas in this circumstance,” said the student. “A heads-up could have gone a long way… the school knows that students go to the hockey games inebriated.”

PEHS recipient of Carleton video project

Thanks to Paul Hager’s CAMS Community Video class at Carleton College, the Prairie’s Edge Humane Society now has a new promo video!

Produced by Sung Hyo Kim, a Carleton senior, this video can be seen by anyone visiting our website to find out more about our facility and our programs. It will be playing in our lobby for visitors to the shelter to watch, we can use it at events and for other promotional purposes as well.

We are so excited to be one of the recipients of a video from this wonderful program for non-profits in our community. PEHS could never afford to hire a professional to produce a video of this quality.

Hyo spent many hours at the shelter, attending events, interviewing staff, filming volunteers and visiting with adopters. From these many hours of filming he was able to edit it down to a high quality video that tells the viewer about PEHS, our mission, programs and services in just over four minutes. He also filmed actual spay and neuter surgeries performed by our shelter veterinarian, Dr. Charlie Gumbusky and then produced two more videos for us, in which you are able to watch a narrated dog and cat spay and a dog neuter. All of these videos can be found on our PEHS website under the Video Library tab. You can also find them on YouTube.

Sung Hyo KimHyo was such a pleasure to work with on this project. He was genuinely interested in our organization and was very professional, polite and accommodating in regards to filming during the times that would fit our staff schedules as well as the shelter schedule and working to really get to know about his video subject. I cannot say enough about how much we enjoyed working with this Carleton student. He is very talented and we hope to keep in touch with him in the future, as our staff grew to respect and enjoy his presence at the shelter. Hyo is from South Korea and he will be returning there once he graduates from Carleton College. He is a very ambitious young man and we know he will do well in whatever he decides to pursue after his graduation.

This class is a great gift to the non-profit organizations in the area who are picked by these students to produce a video each year. I believe there were 5 or 6 groups who benefited from this class in our community. Thank you to Paul Hager and Carleton College for teaching not only the professional production of these videos to these students and allowing our non-profits to benefit from it, but for also instilling in them the responsibility of giving back to a community and giving these students the opportunity to experience the benefits of the non-profits in this area.

Now, sit back and enjoy the show!

Weitz Center for Creativity taking shape

Weitz Center for Creativity Weitz Center for Creativity

Weitz Center for Creativity Weitz Center for Creativity Weitz Center for Creativity

I walked around the construction site of the old Northfield Middle School early this morning (hence the bluish color of the photos), soon to become Carleton College’s Weitz Center for Creativity:

… a facility geared toward creative collaboration that will support multiple student and classroom projects and allow faculty members to teach with words, images, sounds, and narrative in a variety of media.

In addition to housing the departments of Cinema and Media Studies (CAMS), and Theater, and Dance, the space will include a teaching museum, a dramatic theater, a cinema theater, dance studios, classrooms and a coffee shop. The building will also be home to the Presentation, Events and Production Support (PEPS) office and the Idea Lab, a shared, interdisciplinary laboratory for exploring and learning to use technology. The first phase of construction is scheduled to be complete in Fall 2011.

The pros and cons of using Roundup for unwanted grass

Laird Stadium at Carleton College Roundup application notice
I’ve been doing a little barefoot running on the luscious green grass at Laird Stadium at Carleton College lately. On Monday, I saw a sign on the gate alerting people that Roundup (Wikipedia entry) had been applied and to “stay off grass until dry.”

Is this a cause for concern? Are there other cost-effective ways to treat a huge area of grass like this? unwanted grass in cracks?

Update 7/16 9 am:  Thanks to the informed comments below, I’ve removed the words “for a healthy lawn” from the blog post title and replaced it with “for unwanted grass.”

I’ve also struck the phrase “a huge area of grass like this” from the second paragraph and replaced it with “unwanted grass in cracks.”