Tag Archives: Waterford Warriors Snowmobile Club

Snowmobilers in the city limits. An isolated incident?

snowmobile tracks in Hidden Valley Park snowmobile tracks in Hidden Valley Park snowmobile tracks in Hidden Valley Park

snowmobile tracks in Hidden Valley Park snowmobile tracks in Hidden Valley Park
On Sunday night, two snowmobiles went through Hidden Valley Park where it abuts the back yards of the Valley Pond townhouses on the south edge of the pond.  They then cut through the back yards of two of our neighbors. I took the above photos of the snowmobile tracks yesterday afternoon.

Robbie phoned the Northfield Police Department’s non-emergency number to report the incident.  The person she spoke mentioned that city ordinance did allow for snowmobile use within the city limits to get to and from designated snowmobile trails.  So I checked the Northfield municipal code and found out that it’s pretty restrictive. These sleds were definitely in violation:

Sec. 78-207. – Unlawful operation.

It is unlawful for any person to operate a snowmobile, for recreational purposes, within the city, except as provided in section 78-208.

(Code 1986, § 735:05)

Sec. 78-208. – Lawful operation.

It shall be lawful to operate a snowmobile within the city only when:

(1) Traveling to or from designated snowmobile trails on roadways designated to travel to and from designated snowmobile trails. Those roadways are Maple Street, Ames Street, Jefferson Road, roadways which run parallel to any railroad tracks and any roadway that is the most direct route to such streets, on the ditch bottom or outside of trunk county state aid and county highways when highways are within the city;

(2) Operating at speeds not to exceed 20 miles per hour; and

(3) Obeying all motor vehicle laws and ordinances.

In the three years we’ve lived here, this is the first time this has happened, to my knowledge.

Is anyone else experiencing problems with snowmobiles within the city limits?

Any members of the Waterford Warriors Snowmobile Club reading this blog who could comment about the club’s rider education and self-policing efforts?

Northfield area charitable gambling organizations: What percentage of their proceeds is going to community needs?

Which Northfield area organizations are giving a high/decent/respectable percentage of their charitable gambling proceeds to community needs and spending less on their operations?

Today’s Sunday Strib has a front-page story titled Where’s the ‘charity’ in charitable gambling? (That’s a premium link for the next few days, i.e., you need to be a print subscriber and logged in to access it.)

Pull-TabsThis year marks the 25th anniversary of state-regulated charitable gambling in Minnesota, the charitable gambling capital of the nation. Gambling employs more than 12,000 Minnesotans, funnels money to hundreds of charities, and provides entertainment at nearly 3,000 bars, fraternal halls and restaurants in every corner of the state.

But donations to charities have plunged to their lowest levels since 1986. About $32 million, or 3 percent of gross gambling revenues, went to charities in fiscal year 2010, according to a Gambling Control Board analysis this month. That means hundreds of Minnesota groups, such as Boy Scouts, softball teams and food shelves, are receiving smaller or no donations from gambling proceeds.

A second article is titled The trade-off in charitable gambling (premium access also required):

Hundreds of VFWs, American Legions and other groups have come to rely on their charitable gambling revenues to keep their doors open.

A third article (access is open to all) titled How much money goes to charity? has a:

… list of the more than 1,200 organizations that operate charitable gambling in Minnesota, which has been a $1 billion per year industry. They range from VFWs to fire department associations to youth athletic clubs. To sort by city or another column, click on the arrows inside each column head. The column titled "Other Lawful Purpose" refers primarily to property taxes and some building repairs that American Legions, VFWs and other fraternal groups can pay for using gambling profits.

The figures were released this month by the Minnesota Gambling Control Board and cover fiscal year 2010, which is July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. This is not data for the 2010 calendar year.

I put together this screenshot of the data for the Northfield groups. Click to enlarge:

Northfield charitable gambling 2010

So let’s crowdsource the analysis of this data. 

Which Northfield area organizations are doing well, i.e., giving a high/decent/respectable percentage of their charitable gambling proceeds to community needs and spending less on their operations?

And which, if any, are doing poorly?